Great questions lead to great conversation. Meaningful questions lead to meaningful conversation and deep questions lead to a deep conversation.

Questions, and the answers they generate, are the source of awareness, insight, and growth for leaders within companies.

Thoughtstarter

How many times have you delayed or avoided asking a question because you were uncertain or afraid of the answer?

Better Because We Ask

Here’s a question you may have heard before:

Q: What happens when you assume?
A: You make an ass out of u and me.

My good friend and colleague Ryan Lisk, the author of the book RealTime Coaching, reminds readers of the importance of inquiry ahead of assumption.

My perspective and direct connection is that we improve our leadership when we ask more questions and make fewer statements. Why? Because inquiry is the fuel to gain greater clarity and understanding about an individual, situation, problem or challenge.

Fearful of Feedback

Anyone who knows me knows that I not only enjoy asking questions, I enjoy asking tough questions that make people think. And yet… when I first began writing Thoughtwave the idea of getting feedback from readers by asking them questions sort of stopped me in my tracks. That feeling was driven by the uncertainty of the potential answers. I was fearful of feedback, so I never really wanted to engage with or ask questions of the reader. That fear fueled my ignorance related to my writing.

Inputs and Improvement

Last year I wrote about CANI – constant and never-ending improvement. The idea that nothing is ever truly finished or perfect. There is ALWAYS room for improvement and the source of that improvement is often times based on the input and feedback from a group of people known as our employees, customers, clients, readers or community of followers.

No Fear

There should be no fear in asking questions to gain understanding and avoid assumption. If you listen to your employees, customers or community of supporters and seek feedback from them, you’ll understand what’s working well and where you have the opportunity to improve.

In nearly 20 years as an advisor to the leaders who run family businesses, I have come to learn this very important point:

Leadership ignorance is fueled by assumption and the fear to ask important questions that will reveal the true health of any pursuit or business.

I have experienced this individually related to my writing and advise on it regularly as it relates to leadership performance and the advancement of cultures within privately-held and family-owned businesses.

Feedback is essential in moving beyond assumption. It tells the story of the needs and wants of groups of people that are critical to our success. Those inputs, listened to by leaders with wisdom and discernment, offer a powerful combination in getting to the core of eliminating the contradictions that can stall leaders and their companies.

Don’t assume. It’s a bad place from which to make decisions. Ask more questions. This provides the context by which you can make better decisions.

Be Authentic. Be Purposeful. Make it Meaningful

Brent